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If you are infected with a disease subject to preventative measures at schools (designated school infectious disease)

If you have contracted, or suspect you have contracted, an infectious disease subject to preventative measures at schools (see list below), TMU will suspend your attendance under the provisions of the School Health and Safety Act and the Regulations Enforcing the School Health and Safety Act. This measure is to prevent infections within the university and to prevent the spread of infections.

Steps to be taken should you be diagnosed as having contracted, or suspected of having contracted, a designated school infectious disease

  1. After you have been examined at a medical facility and diagnosed as having contracted, or suspected of having contracted, a designated school infectious disease, please immediately inform the university by telephone.
    Registrar, Academic & Student Affairs Division (Student Affairs)
    03-3819-1211 extension 222
    If you are diagnosed as having contracted, or suspected of having contracted, a designated school infectious disease during field work, immediately inform your supervising academic staff member.
  2. Until your physician permits you to return to university activities, avoid leaving your home except for medical examinations and concentrate on your recovery.
  3. If your attendance has been suspended by TMU, wait until your symptoms have abated and the period of treatment indicated by your physician has come to an end. Then have yourself re-examined at the same medical facility and have the facility complete a Certificate of Recovery from Infectious Disease (you will be charged a fee). Submit the certificate as soon as possible to the Registrar. Also, submit an Absence Form or Exam Request (Make-Up Exam) if needed at this time.
  4. Arrangements will be made, the extent possible, for you to make up the classes, exams, and other school work you missed during the suspension of attendance to ensure you are not disadvantaged academically.
  5. After recovery, please fill out an application for reimbursement if you are a WILL insurance subscriber.

Classes of designated school infectious diseases and suspension of attendance periods (Article 18 of the Regulations Enforcing the School Health and Safety Act)

Infectious Disease NameSuspension of Attendance Period
Class I

Ebola hemorrhagic fever; Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever; Smallpox; South American hemorrhagic fevers; Plague; Marburg disease; Lassa fever; Polio; Diphtheria; Severe acute respiratory syndrome (in which the pathogen is the SARS coronavirus of the betacoronavirus genus); Middle East respiratory syndrome
(in which the pathogen is the MERS coronavirus of the betacoronavirus genus); and Specified avian influenza (avian influenza specified under the Act on the Prevention of Infectious Diseases and Medical Care for Patients with Infectious Diseases)

Until full recovery

Class II

Influenza (other than Specified avian influenza); Whooping cough; Measles; Mumps; Rubella (German measles); Chicken pox; Pharyngoconjunctival fever; Tuberculosis; and Meningococcic meningitis

See details below

Class III

Cholera; Bacillary dysentery; Enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection; Typhoid fever; Paratyphoid; Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis; Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis

Until a physician determines the patient is not at risk of infecting others

Class of Infectious DiseaseSuspension of Attendance Period
Influenza Five days after onset and two days after fever abatement
Whooping cough Until the characteristic cough has stopped, or until the completion of a five-day antibiotic therapy course
Measles Three days after fever alleviation
Mumps Five days after the appearance of swelling in the parotid gland, submandibular gland, and / or sublingual gland and after overall physical condition has improved favorably
Rubella (German measles) Until the rash has completely disappeared
Chicken pox Until all blisters have scabbed over
Pharyngoconjunctival fever Two days after the disappearance of primary symptoms
Tuberculosis Until a physician determines the patient is not at risk of infecting others
Meningococcic meningitis Until a physician determines the patient is not at risk of infecting others