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Faculty Guide

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History and Characteristics

History

April 1986
Tokyo Metropolitan College of Allied Medical Sciences opened
Student intake: Division of Nursing Sciences – 80, Division of Physical Therapy – 30, Division of Occupational Therapy – 30, Division of Clinical Radiology – 40, total 180 students
(With the opening of the College, the Tokyo Metropolitan Shinjuku Nursing College, Fuchu Rehabilitation College and College of Clinical Radiology were closed down in March 1988)
April 1994 Student intake to Divisions of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy each increased from 30 to 40
April 1998 Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences opened
March 2000 Tokyo Metropolitan College of Allied Medical Sciences closed
April 2002 Graduate school master’s course established
April 2004 Graduate school doctor’s course established
April 2005 Tokyo Metropolitan University established as a public university corporation, Tokyo Metropolitan University opened (Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences stops recruiting students)
April 2006 Graduate School of Human Health Sciences opened
March 2011 Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences closed
April 2012 Midwifery course established

Characteristics

Formerly known as the Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences, the Faculty of Health Sciences (hereinafter “this Faculty”) was launched as a faculty specializing in healthcare and medicine at Tokyo Metropolitan University upon its inauguration in April 2005.

Tokyo faces numerous challenges today, with major changes affecting the circumstances of healthcare, medicine and welfare (illustrated by the rapid advance of birth rate decline and aging and changes in the structure of disease). These challenges include providing lifelong healthcare, establishing a system of community care, and creating collaborative links between healthcare, medicine and welfare to address increasingly complex and diverse needs. To meet these challenges, the Faculty of Health Sciences was launched with the philosophy of helping to create a “vigorous long-living society” – a new society in which people who live and work in Tokyo will maintain and enhance the functions of their daily lives while proactively using healthcare, medicine and welfare services, and as a result will be able to enjoy happy lives. Based on this philosophy, the Faculty aims to educate and research broad-ranging knowledge and specialist academic learning on healthcare and medicine, develop human resources equipped with high erudition and practical ability as well as rich human qualities, and thereby develop future leaders who will improve healthcare and medicine and contribute to the enhancement of health and welfare.

As the only public faculty dealing with healthcare and medicine in Tokyo, this Faculty is taking active steps to incorporate the healthcare, medicine and welfare problems of major cities in the content of its education and research, while seeking close collaboration with local healthcare and medical institutions. The Faculty is also promoting cross-sector collaborative projects related to healthcare, medicine and welfare, and, for example, endeavoring to stimulate startups in ventures such as medical and welfare equipment. At the same time, as a hub for academic networks in healthcare and medicine for the metropolitan region, and as a university that makes a contribution to society, we have continued and developed collaborative and cooperative projects with metropolitan hospitals, various cross-sector exchange projects with municipalities, health guidance based on healthcare programs, joint hosting of sports tournaments, and others undertaken since the days of the former Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences.

The Graduate School of Human Health Sciences (hereinafter “this graduate school”) is a research facility specializing in human healthcare, medicine and welfare in Tokyo Metropolitan University since its launch in April 2006. This graduate school has taken over several courses previously offered in now defunct institutions: namely, the Nursing Sciences major, the Physical Therapy major, the Occupational Therapy major, the Radiology major, and the Health Science major in the Graduate School of Health Science at the former Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences, the Sports Science major in the Graduate School of Physical Science at the former Tokyo Metropolitan University (Tokyo Toritsu Daigaku), and the Health and Nutrition Sciences course at Tokyo Metropolitan College.

Based on the theme of “healthcare” for residents of mega-cities, this graduate school has the basic philosophy of contributing to “healthcare” through its research and education and aiming to create a vigorous long-living society. To tackle interdisciplinary and integrated education and research, this graduate school has reorganized the aforementioned four majors at the former Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences, the Sports Science major at the former Tokyo Metropolitan University and the Health and Nutrition Sciences course at Tokyo Metropolitan College into six research departments (groups). This enables graduate students and staff to communicate across different research departments and fields, make scientific approaches to human health sciences from both practical and research fields, and make a varied contribution to people’s lives. Besides this, the Health Promotion Sciences Department (group) also supports subsidiary subjects in the corresponding field in undergraduate education and the academic background of various programs of the Open University, and contributes to providing opportunities for education and research as a step-up to postgraduate study for guest auditors and lecture observers.

This graduate school has continued collaborative postgraduate agreements with the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (*) and Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, which were concluded back in the days of the former Tokyo Metropolitan University of Health Sciences and Tokyo Metropolitan University. It has created a system for practical education and research in metropolitan hospitals and other facilities related to healthcare, medicine and welfare, and is continuously using these education and research environments. It also strives actively to train professional nurses, medical physicists and other high-level expert professionals. Meanwhile, the school has created a system of day and night lectures and developed a system of broadly accepting of working students, since workers in healthcare, medicine and welfare have very high needs for career enhancement and lifelong education.